Greek Yogurt and Gout

Greek Yogurt and Gout explains links between Greek yogurt, gout, and uric acid. Specifically, I show how Greek yogurt can be good for gout. But only if you eat it in the right way.

Greek Yogurt and Gout Audience

I wrote Greek Yogurt and Gout for GoutPal Foodies. GoutPal Foodies are gout sufferers who want to eat better gout foods. But, they do not have a healthy eating plan. So, I explain how Greek Yogurt might help gout sufferers. But, only if you incorporate it into a healthy gout foundation diet.

Are you unsure which type of gout sufferer you are? Then, before you read this article, go to Questions for Gout Sufferers.

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Gout Foods: Figs and Gout

Figs and gout is the 88th topic in the top gout searches series, described in Gout and You. Figs are a delicious food, often associated with an alkalizing gout diet menu. Before I discuss that, I need to clarify a specific link between figs and gout.

Some time ago, when reviewing how morin is helpful to gout sufferers, I started trying to find the best food sources for morin. I have some useful news about morin, but I cannot find anything meaningful about food sources. Though many gout studies associate morin with figs, those that do reveal sources always refer to extracts from mulberry bark. There are one or two studies into morin extracts from fig leaves, but nothing so far about the fruit. I believe the confusion may arise because mulberry and fig belong to the same plant group. Indeed the wide range of plants in the Moraceae family are often called the fig family or mulberry family. I will stop associating fig fruit with morin unless I find real evidence that it is a useful source. I will report the morin news separately. Meanwhile, back to figs…

Dried figs are often viewed as highly alkalizing. This is one of the dangers of comparing foods based on 100g portion sizes. Nobody eats 100 grams of dried figs. This was one reason why all my recent tables are based on 100 calories servings. It is still not perfect, as many beverages and spices produce outrageously large portion sizes. However, energy based portions are easier to compare than weight based portions.

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Gout Diet Including Food, Drink & Lifestyle

Gout diet can be complicated, but do not worry.
I am here to make it easy for you to choose food that helps your gout.

Note, it’s YOUR gout diet.

Most of what you read about gout diet does not apply to you.
Gout diet must be personal.

Gout affects everyone differently, and everyone has different tastes.
I urge you to start with what you like to eat.
I will help you find ways to eat your favorite foods that make your gout better.

Everyone seems to think that gout is a disease caused by food. It is not! Your diet can affect gout, but it is only part of the story.

In these gout diet guidelines, I explain all the different ways that food can affect gout – good and bad. These are good reference pages that reflect current scientific research. But if you do not know where to start, then the best place starts with yourself. If you go to the gout forum, tell me some facts about your gout, some ideas about your favorite foods, or some of your worries about what you can eat, I will help you find the right guidelines that suit your situation. That way, you can focus on what matters to you, and safely ignore food facts that are not relevant to your gout. All you need to do is ask about your gout diet in the gout forum.

Gout Diet Preparation

I’ve written these gout diet pages for people who have a confirmed gout diagnosis, and a personal treatment plan. You should study the Gout Symptoms pages, and the Gout Treatment pages before you study this Gout Diet Section. If you do not do this, you risk wasting your time making dietary changes that do not help you. Gout diet should help your treatment plan, not replace it! Without a treatment plan, you cannot tell if your diet is helping, or making gout worse.

I can help you create a personal gout treatment plan, but if you are determined to focus on diet without a treatment plan, please look at Diet For Gout Sufferers.

Gout Diet Topics

Gout Diet Help imageThere is a lot of information about gout diet here, so I have divided it into subsections:

  1. How food affects gout
  2. Food as gout treatment
  3. Medical Food Issues
  4. Good Gout Food
  5. Bad Gout Food
  6. Other Gout Diet Pages
  7. More Gout Diet Help

How Food Affects Gout

What are sensible gout diet restrictions, and what are ludicrous limitations. The articles in this part of the Gout Diet section deal with how food affects gout.

Sensible Gout Diet Restrictions
An overview of the way food affects gout. Why dietary restrictions for gout are only sensible if you have a gout treatment plan.
How Purines Affect Gout
You need to know how purines affect gout before you start planning any gout diet changes. Most advice about purines is out-of-date, so check this guide before you waste any more time.
Diet For Gout
When you plan a diet for gout patients, the emphasis must be on the patient. The diet for gout pages help you start by recognizing the individual needs of each gout patient, then planning slow but steady improvements. You get individualized gout diet plans that work.

Food As Gout Treatment

Given that food can play a part in a good gout treatment plan, this subsection looks at the way you need to incorporate diet and lifestyle changes in your recovery and maintenance plans.

Gout Foods – The Best Approach
If you want the best gout foods, you must change your gout diet to suit you. Don’t be a gout sheep – follow your own needs.

Medical Food Issues

Medical aspects of foods for gout sufferers.

Diet For Gout Patients
An overview of how some gout diet and lifestyle issues directly affect gout treatments.
Gout Diet Menu
Alkalizing influences and approaches.

Good Gout Food

Some foods are more beneficial than others. This subsection highlights food and associated lifestyle changes that can help gout, including recipes.

Gout Diet Foods To Eat
An overview of foods that are beneficial to gout sufferers.
Gout Food Recipes
Enjoy your gout food with these recipes. Let GoutPal adapt your favorites for your best gout diet.
Cherry Juice For Gout
Cherry juice for gout seems the ideal gout treatment. Gout studies show cherries lower uric acid, ease inflammation, and reduce gout pain. Will it work for you? See the Cherry Juice For Gout guidelines. Also see Is there a Cherry Juice Gout Cure? and Gout, Cherries & Cherry Juice: Your Thoughts.

Bad Gout Food

With good planning, you can enjoy most food, but some foods need careful handling and there are hidden dangers in many common food items. This subsection deals with food that can be bad for gout.

What foods cause gout?
High purine foods, eaten over many years, are bad for gout. However, there are four more bad food groups. Some of these might be worse than purines for your gout. See which foods cause gout, and make your gout diet safe.
Foods To Avoid With Gout
An overview of foods and dietary habits that should be restricted or avoided, with additional pages detailing key problems:

Purine Rich Foods
Purine rich foods tables are often used by gout sufferers. But don’t waste time on pointless purines that have no effect on gout.

Other Gout Diet Articles

These are pages that relate to gout diet, but do not fit neatly into any of the above categories. Most are general nutrition guides and food composition tables. They are listed separately on the Diet For Gout Sufferers & Other Gouty Lifestyle Issues page. The other gout diet articles listed below include some old style pages that I am in the process of reviewing and reformatting. I will incorporate these into the new website structure during the next few weeks.

Purine metabolism
High Purine Foods Myths
The foods that cause gout are not simply high purine foods
Learn the foods that cause gout and you can manage your diet to avoid attacks. But don’t believe everything you are told – it’s not just about avoiding purines.
Delicious Recipes For Gout Help You Eat Yourself Better
Do not think that only low purine recipes are good for gout. These recipes for gout explode the myths and bring you tasty meals and snacks for a winning gout diet (or even a weight losing one).
What Is Uric Acid Food?
Do you want to know more about uric acid food. Remember that it is important to manage your whole diet, but here are some gout foods that every gout sufferer asks about.
Purines and Pyrimidines and Other Gout Diet Research
Purines and pyrimidines are at the heart of gout diet studies, but there are many more interesting topics. See these investigations dispel all gout food myths.

More Gout Diet Help

As you can see, there are many gout diet issues, but I urge you not to become obsessed by food.

Especially avoid connecting specific foods to gout – it is your whole diet that matters, not just one or two food and drink items.

You need to assess your current diet, in the context of your height, weight, lifestyle, and health. Then develop a plan to gradually improve any weaknesses. I can help you do this, with personal help for your gout. I offer a special gout support service that lets you maintain your own personal gout records, if you wish.

You can get updates to current discussions about gout diet, and other gout issues, from my Gout Forum Update Service.

To keep up-to-date with gout discussions, please use this form:
Enter your email address:

Subscription is free and your email address is safe – I will never share it with anyone else. See more about GoutPal Update Services.

If you want more information about aspects of gout other than diet, see the Gout Guidelines Introduction.

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Gout Foods Table for Sweets

Do you want to eat candy, ice cream, and other sweets with gout? Go ahead and treat yourself, just don’t overdo it. There is no specific problem with sweets, unless they are overloaded with added fructose. This is usually high fructose corn syrup, which can raise uric acid. Apart from that, moderate sweet intake as part of a calorie controlled diet will not make gout worse.

The best diet for gout sufferers is based on an alkaline gout diet menu. Here is a list of sweets with nutrients analyzed for their contribution to an alkaline diet, and other nutrients important to gout.

The gout foods table for sweets covers key foods in the Sweets group from the USDA food database.

All my gout foods tables are based on a serving size that provides 100 calories (Kcals) of energy. This is different from most earlier food tables on GoutPal. I explain why in my gout foods table introduction, where you can learn the importance of each nutrient for gout sufferers. If you are new to my gout foods tables, it is very important that you read that introduction, and understand how to use these tables effectively.

Sweets should always be seen as treats to make your diet interesting and enjoyable. In moderation, you can include sweets in a healthy diet, but you must be aware of the risks.

If you look at the energy column in the sweets table, you will see that all portion sizes to achieve 100 calories are very small. You must limit calorie intake from sweets. Current guidance from Harvard is a maximum of 100 calories from sweets for women, and 150 for men. As well as general health issues, there are also potential gout risks from excessive calories. Learn why in Is Sugar Bad for Gout?.

Gout Foods Table for Sweets

Long Description 100 Kcal Serve(g) Vitamin C (mg) PRAL Score Iron (mg) GoutPal Index
GoutPal Imaginary Standard 100 Kcal Serving 100 3 -2 1 1.9
Syrups, maple 38 0 -2 0 1.5
Sherbet, orange 69 2 -1 0 1.4
Frozen novelties, ice type, lime 78 1 0 0 0.9
Ice creams, vanilla, light 56 1 0 0 0.8
Ice creams, vanilla 48 0 0 0 0.7
Jellies 38 0 0 0 0.6
Sugars, brown 26 0 -1 0 0.6
Ice creams, chocolate 46 0 -1 0 0.5
Honey 33 0 0 0 0.4
Syrups, table blends, pancake, with 2% maple 38 0 0 0 0.3
Candies, caramels 26 0 0 0 0.3
Sugars, granulated 26 0 0 0 0.3
Sugars, powdered 26 0 0 0 0.2
Candies, hard 25 0 0 0 0.2
Candies, gumdrops, starch jelly pieces 25 0 0 0 0.2
Ice creams, vanilla, rich 40 0 0 0 0.2
Average Sweets 100 Kcal Serving 34 0 -1 1 0.1
Candies, marshmallows 31 0 0 0 0.1
Candies, MARS SNACKFOOD US, M&M’s Milk Chocolate Candies 20 0 0 0 0.0
Candies, MARS SNACKFOOD US, TWIX Caramel Cookie Bars 20 0 0 0 0.0
Candies, MARS SNACKFOOD US, SNICKERS Bar 20 0 0 0 0.0
Candies, semisweet chocolate 21 0 -1 1 -0.1
Candies, sweet chocolate coated fondant 27 0 0 0 -0.1
Candies, MARS SNACKFOOD US, M&M’s Peanut Chocolate Candies 19 0 0 0 -0.2
Candies, milk chocolate 19 0 0 0 -0.3
Cocoa, dry powder, unsweetened, processed with alkali 45 0 -14 7 -0.4
Baking chocolate, unsweetened, squares 20 0 -1 3 -3.0

I list Sweets in GoutPal Index order above, which is great for most people’s needs. Do you have special nutritional goals with personal allowances for energy, vitamin C, pH balancing, or iron? Soon, you will be able to sort the table by those factors. If you want to know when these improvements to gout foods tables are available, please subscribe to my free gout information update service.

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Gout Foods Table for Vegetables

The gout foods table for vegetables covers key foods in the Vegetables and Vegetable Products group from the USDA food database.

My gout foods tables are based on a serving size that provides 100 calories (Kcals) of energy. This is different from most earlier food tables on GoutPal. I explain why in my gout foods table introduction, where you can learn all about these tables. If you are new to my gout foods tables, it is very important that you read that introduction, and understand what these tables are about.

Generally speaking, vegetables should form about one third of your daily diet. For most people, that is enough – vegetables are good for you, so make sure fruit and vegetables are half of everything you eat. The easiest way to plan what you eat is to follow that simple rule, along with other good general nutrition advice. If you want to plan your diet in more detail, then you can use the gout foods table below to choose the best vegetables to help you meet your nutritional goals.

My overall approach to gout diet, is first to make sure you are eating a healthy balanced diet. Then you might want to tweak that diet to help your gout treatment plan better. That is why I produced these gout foods tables. You can use them to check if your diet is healthy. If you want to go further, you can set yourself precise nutritional goals, and use the tables to find foods that best meet those goals.

The gout foods tables are all based on my imaginary standard for the “best food.” In future, you will be able to set your own standards, but the current tables still work fine for most people.

If you like a simple approach to gout diet, just make sure that fruit and vegetables form about half your diet, with about twice as much vegetables compared to fruit. Variety is more important than trying to decide if one vegetable is better than another.

Vegetable Table  for Gout Sufferers PhotographPlease note that vegetables listed below are those from the USDA Key Foods list. It might miss some of your personal favorites. This does not really matter, as you can get a reasonable approximation of the nutrient value by comparison with similar vegetables. As no single item should form a significant part of your total diet, this is near enough. If you really need that precision, please ask in the gout forums, and I will prepare a personal table that includes all your favorites, if I can find nutrition data.

Long Description 100 Kcal Serve(g) Vitamin C (mg) PRAL Score Iron (mg) GoutPal Index
Peppers, sweet, green, raw 500 402 -15 1.7 144.4
Parsley, raw 278 369 -31 17.2 122.2
Vegetable juice cocktail, canned 526 286 -17 1.5 107.3
Broccoli, raw 294 262 -12 2.1 93.8
Broccoli, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 286 185 -10 1.9 67.6
Cabbage, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 435 163 -14 0.7 65.0
Turnip greens, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 500 137 -25 4.0 58.7
Spinach, raw 435 122 -51 11.8 57.7
Kale, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 357 146 -15 3.2 56.4
Cabbage, raw 400 146 -11 1.9 56.3
Tomatoes, red, ripe, cooked 556 127 -19 3.8 53.2
Chicory greens, raw 435 104 -36 3.9 52.9
Broccoli, frozen, spears, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 357 143 -5 2.2 51.4
Tomato juice, canned, with salt added 588 108 -25 2.5 51.3
Broccoli, frozen, chopped, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 357 143 -1 2.2 49.6
Brussels sprouts, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 238 109 -7 1.1 41.0
Tomatoes, red, ripe, raw, year round average 556 76 -23 1.5 40.6
Mustard greens, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 385 97 -9 3.3 37.3
Lettuce, green leaf, raw 667 61 -21 5.7 31.2
Spinach, canned, regular pack, drained solids 435 62 -34 10.0 31.1
Endive, raw 588 38 -35 4.9 30.9
Tomatoes, red, ripe, canned, packed in tomato juice 588 55 -21 5.7 28.2
Celery, raw 625 19 -31 1.3 27.1
Average Vegetables and Vegetable Products 320 60 -13 2.9 26.6
Onions, spring or scallions (includes tops and bulb), raw 313 59 -16 4.6 25.4
Cucumber, peeled, raw 833 27 -19 1.8 24.7
Spinach, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 435 43 -45 15.5 23.7
Tomato products, canned, sauce 417 29 -25 4.3 21.5
Collards, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 303 55 -7 3.4 21.1
Squash, summer, all varieties, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 500 28 -16 1.8 20.0
Lettuce, cos or romaine, raw 588 24 -25 5.7 19.9
Lettuce, iceberg (includes crisphead types), raw 714 20 -16 2.9 18.4
Tomato products, canned, paste, without salt added 122 27 -22 3.6 16.9
Tomato products, canned, paste, with salt added 122 27 -22 3.6 16.9
Asparagus, cooked, boiled, drained 455 35 -10 4.1 16.6
Squash, winter, all varieties, cooked, baked, without salt 270 26 -12 1.2 16.2
Tomatoes, red, ripe, canned, stewed 385 30 -15 5.1 15.8
Pickles, cucumber, dill or kosher dill 833 7 -16 3.1 15.1
Carrot juice, canned 250 21 -12 1.2 14.3
Carrots, raw 244 14 -14 0.7 13.4
Beans, snap, green, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 286 28 -6 1.9 13.0
Potato, flesh and skin, raw 130 26 -8 1.0 12.9
Sweet potato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt 111 22 -9 0.8 12.1
Carrots, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 286 10 -12 1.0 11.1
Onions, raw 250 19 -5 0.5 10.6
Beans, snap, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained without salt 357 15 -9 2.4 10.4
Potatoes, mashed, dehydrated, flakes without milk, dry form 28 23 -4 0.3 9.7
Potatoes, boiled, cooked in skin, flesh, without salt 115 15 -7 0.4 9.2
Potatoes, baked, flesh, without salt 108 14 -7 0.4 8.5
Spinach, frozen, chopped or leaf, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 294 6 -20 5.8 8.5
Sweet potato, cooked, boiled, without skin 132 17 -5 0.9 8.4
Onions, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 227 12 -5 0.5 8.0
Mushrooms, white, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 357 14 -13 6.2 7.8
Potato, baked, flesh and skin, without salt 108 10 -9 1.2 7.7
Carrots, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 270 6 -9 1.4 7.7
Beans, snap, green, canned, regular pack, drained solids 400 11 -7 3.5 7.0
Potatoes, boiled, cooked without skin, flesh, without salt 116 9 -6 0.4 6.7
Sweet potato, canned, syrup pack, solids and liquids 112 12 -3 0.9 5.7
Peas, green, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 119 17 0 1.8 4.8
Potatoes, french fried, all types, salt added in processing, frozen, home-prepared, oven heated 61 8 -3 0.5 4.5
Catsup 89 4 -5 0.4 4.2
Potatoes, hashed brown, home-prepared 38 5 -3 0.2 3.5
Corn, sweet, yellow, frozen, kernels cut off cob, boiled, drained, without salt 123 4 -2 0.6 2.9
Corn, sweet, yellow, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 104 6 -1 0.5 2.8
Vegetables, mixed, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 154 5 -2 1.3 2.7
Peas, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 128 13 3 1.9 2.0
GoutPal Imaginary Standard 100 Kcal Serving 100 3 -2 0.9 1.9
Potato puffs, frozen, oven-heated 52 2 -1 0.3 1.5
Corn, sweet, yellow, canned, whole kernel, drained solids 127 2 0 0.7 1.4
Peas, green (includes baby and lesuer types), canned, drained solids, unprepared 147 6 2 1.7 0.4
Pickle relish, sweet 77 1 0 0.7 0.3

The table is sorted in GoutPal Index order, where my Index is based on the best of all relevant nutrients. This is fine, as all vegetables are good, so you should concentrate on variety.

Soon, you will be able to sort the table by different columns. If you want to know when these improvements to gout foods tables are available, please subscribe to my free gout information update service.

Leave Gout Foods Table for Fruit and Juices to browse the Gout Foods guidelines

Gout Foods Table for Legumes

The gout foods table for legumes covers key foods in the Legumes and Legume Products group from the USDA food database.

My gout foods tables are based on a serving size that provides 100 calories (Kcals) of energy. This is different from most earlier food tables on GoutPal. I explain why in my gout foods table introduction, where you can learn all about these tables. If you are new to my gout foods tables, it is very important that you read that introduction, and understand what these tables are about.

Legumes are the fruit or seeds of a specific family of plants. They are generally considered to be a healthy protein source for gout sufferers. Though a vegetable, legumes are often a better alternative to items from the Gout Foods Table for Meat. In the case of peanuts, you will find many relevant comparisons in the Gout Foods Table for Nuts. Note that some out-of-date references might still include some legumes as foods high in uric acid. As I explain in that table, and the notes around my purine rich foods table, vegetable proteins are unlikely to raise uric acid levels.

Long Description 100 Kcal Serve(g) Vitamin C (mg) PRAL Score Iron (mg) GoutPal Index
Soymilk, original and vanilla, with added calcium, vitamins A and D 233 0 -4 1 3.2
Refried beans, canned, traditional style (includes USDA commodity) 110 7 -2 2 2.2
GoutPal Imaginary Standard 100 Kcal Serving 100 3 -2 1 1.9
Beans, pinto, mature seeds, raw 29 2 -3 1 0.7
Beans, black, mature seeds, raw 29 0 -4 1 0.6
Soy sauce made from soy and wheat (shoyu) 189 0 -3 3 0.1
Beans, baked, canned, plain or vegetarian 106 0 -1 1 0.1
Beans, kidney, red, mature seeds, canned 123 1 0 2 -0.1
Beans, white, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 72 0 -4 3 -0.2
Beans, pinto, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 70 1 -1 1 -0.3
Average Legumes Standard 100 Kcal Serving 72 1 -1 2 -0.3
Beans, baked, canned, with franks 70 2 1 1 -0.4
Peanuts, all types, oil-roasted, with salt 17 0 1 0 -0.7
Peanuts, all types, oil-roasted, without salt 17 0 1 0 -0.7
Peanuts, all types, dry-roasted, with salt 17 0 1 0 -0.8
Peanuts, all types, dry-roasted, without salt 17 0 1 0 -0.8
Peanut butter, smooth style, with salt 17 0 1 0 -0.8
Peanut butter, smooth, reduced fat 19 0 1 0 -0.9
Beans, baked, canned, with pork and tomato sauce 106 3 -1 3 -1.2
Beans, kidney, red, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 79 1 0 2 -1.3
Lentils, raw 29 1 2 2 -2.5
Lentils, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 86 1 2 3 -2.8

The table is sorted in GoutPal Index order, where my Index is based on the best of all relevant nutrients. This is fine, as all vegetables are good, so you should concentrate on variety.

Soon, you will be able to sort the table by different columns. If you want to know when these improvements to gout foods tables are available, please subscribe to my free gout information update service.

Leave Gout Foods Table for Legumes to browse the Gout Foods guidelines

Gout Foods: Granola and Gout

Granola and gout is the 90th topic in the Gout and You series.

You can find granola in the Gout Foods Table for BreakFats Cereals and, as a granola bar, in the Gout Foods Table for Snacks. I was a little annoyed when I first looked at granola and gout, as I thought the diversity of granola recipes would make it impossible. Then I got really annoyed, but more of that shortly.

As a breakfast cereal, all the granola items in the gout foods table are similar. They do not get highlighted as high value cereals because, despite being a valuable source of fiber, they are very high in total sugar. If the rest of your diet is low in sugar, then granola makes a good choice. The main ingredient is oats, and this does not significantly affect gout inflammation or uric acid.

Continue reading Gout Foods: Granola and Gout