Gout Blog

Simple Gout Treatment

I know gout can be complicated, but let’s try the simple approach to gout treatment before we look for difficulties.

Gout treatment is the heart of finding gout freedom.

Gout treatment must be preceded by a proper medical diagnosis of your gout symptoms.

Gout treatment might  be followed by adjustment to your gout diet.

So for all of you making life difficult for yourselves by worrying about food and drink – stop now. Do not even think about diet until you have a good gout management plan.

1. Starting A Gout Treatment Plan

The best gout treatment plan starts with good diagnosis from your doctor(s). If you have a confirmed gout diagnosis then move to step 2.

Gout diagnosis can be difficult for a small minority of gout patients. For most people, it is very simple.

If your gout symptoms are not confirmed, see your doctor or rheumatologist today. If they are confirmed, a more complete analysis of possible causes is useful, but not essential. If you have it, it may give you more options for gout treatment.

I will announce a personal gout symptoms assessment tool soon. In the meantime read the Gout Symptoms section, which is first in the list of sections near the top and bottom of every page. If you still have questions, ask in the Gout Symptoms forum.

Continue to read your simple 3 step gout treatment plan

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About Ads from GoutPal

Why Gout Patients Need GoutPal#1 – Doctor Dispute

Gout Doctor Dispute is my first in an occasional series explaining why gout patients need GoutPal. So, in this article, I explain how rheumatologists and physicians disagree about gout treatment. Then I explain how GoutPal can guide you through this dispute towards full Gout Recovery.

Gout Doctor Dispute Audience

I wrote Gout Doctor Dispute for gout patients who want to improve the relationship with their doctor. Because I know from my forum that many gout patients disagree with, or misunderstand, their doctor’s advice about gout. So, my initial review of new professional guidance should create a better platform for doctors and gout patients to work together.

continue reading Gout Doctor Dispute

Gout Foods: Figs and Gout

Figs and gout is the 88th topic in the top gout searches series, described in Gout and You. Figs are a delicious food, often associated with an alkalizing gout diet menu. Before I discuss that, I need to clarify a specific link between figs and gout.

Some time ago, when reviewing how morin is helpful to gout sufferers, I started trying to find the best food sources for morin. I have some useful news about morin, but I cannot find anything meaningful about food sources. Though many gout studies associate morin with figs, those that do reveal sources always refer to extracts from mulberry bark. There are one or two studies into morin extracts from fig leaves, but nothing so far about the fruit. I believe the confusion may arise because mulberry and fig belong to the same plant group. Indeed the wide range of plants in the Moraceae family are often called the fig family or mulberry family. I will stop associating fig fruit with morin unless I find real evidence that it is a useful source. I will report the morin news separately. Meanwhile, back to figs…

Dried figs are often viewed as highly alkalizing. This is one of the dangers of comparing foods based on 100g portion sizes. Nobody eats 100 grams of dried figs. This was one reason why all my recent tables are based on 100 calories servings. It is still not perfect, as many beverages and spices produce outrageously large portion sizes. However, energy based portions are easier to compare than weight based portions.

Continue reading Figs and Gout

What Is Gout #3 ? The Apple Cider Vinegar Myth

For many years I have tried to produce a comprehensive review of apple cider vinegar for gout. I have finally given up, for a very simple reason.

Despite the high level of interest amongst gout sufferers for ACV (Apple Cider Vinegar), there is absolutely no scientific information to say that ACV is good for gout. Having said that, there is no evidence to say it does not work. There is just no information.

The only mentions of apple cider vinegar relating to gout or uric acid, are only acknowledgments that many people believe that ACV helps gout followed by declarations that there is no evidence for this.

I am intrigued that such strong support for the benefits of apple cider vinegar can exist alongside zero evidence, but there are three explanations of how this may happen.
what are explanations for The Apple Cider Vinegar Myth?

Any Hope For Gout Joint Damage?

In Any Hope For Gout Joint Damage, I explain how joints damaged by gout might be impossible to repair. Above all, I warn against allowing gout to damage your joints. Because gout joint damage is much easier to prevent than repair.

Gout Joint Damage Audience

I wrote Gout Joint Damage for Gout Victims. Because gout sufferers who do not control excess uric acid suffer needlessly. So, I want you to understand the dangers of untreated excess uric acid. If you want to know more about your gout sufferer type, read Questions for Gout Sufferers first.

continue reading Gout Joint Damage

Ouch! Why does Gout Recovery hurt?

This Gout Recovery article explains pain during uric acid lowering. In particular, I explain why you get gout pain in new places during gout recovery.

Gout Recovery Audience

I wrote Ouch! Why does Gout Recovery hurt? for all gout sufferers who want to lower their uric acid. To clarify, that’s all the types of gout sufferer I identify in Questions for Gout Sufferers, except Gout Victims. But, Gout Victims should also read this. Or else they’ll die.

continue reading Ouch! Why does Gout Recovery hurt?

How to Avoid Gout Medication Side Effects

How to Avoid Gout Medication Side Effects tells you about managing all gout treatments. So, I describe a general approach to safe gout medication. Because many side effects are caused by bad treatment plans.

Gout Medication Side Effects Audience

I wrote Gout Medication Side Effects mainly for Gout Victims who will not start uric acid control. Because they feel they cannot manage side effects safely. So, they stop their treatment instead of managing it properly.

Also, this is useful for any gout sufferer who is scared of gout medication side effects. So, do you know which type of gout sufferer you are? If not, please read Questions for Gout Sufferers before you continue.

continue reading How to Avoid Gout Medication Side Effects

What Is Gouty Arthritis?

Are you confused between gouty arthritis and gout?

What is the difference? Are they the same?

The short answer is – gouty arthritis is just another way of saying gout. So, if you are looking for a medical definition of gout, see What Is Gout.

It is interesting to look a bit deeper. Because both terms mean the same. So, why do I use different terms at different times?

What Is Gouty Arthritis?

Gout is the most common term. But the correct medical term is gouty arthritis. As arthritis is the medical term for many diseases that cause inflamed joints.

So, I use the term gout mostly. Also, in my experience, most doctors do the same. Because it is shorter, more common, and most people recognize it as a medical condition that involves painful joints.
Continue reading to learn why it is important to know what gouty arthritis means.