Every day we see health claims for honey. But almost all are unfounded. More importantly, such claims help to mask the real problem – most of us eat too much sugar.

Now that is very significant for gout sufferers. Because too much added sugar adds weight. Clearly, that happens if added sugar is in its granulated form, as syrup, or as honey. If you eat too much honey the added weight makes gout worse.

But what if you have good eating habits? Let’s say you:

  • Have normal body weight.
  • Eat healthily according to government guidelines on balanced eating patterns.
  • Check uric acid levels at least once a year. With more frequent blood tests when you change your diet. Possibly by monitoring your uric acid at home.

Congratulations – those are the qualities that make you a GoutPal Dieter. So you are the ideal candidate to test the benefits of honey for gout.

Honey for Gout Purpose

I’ve written Honey for Gout to summarize the latest research. Because this can help you discuss potential diet changes with your health professionals. Then you might make improvements to your gout management plan.

Remember, diet is a small part of your treatment plan. Also honey consumption should be a small part of your total food intake. So you need to consider this as one of many improvements that can contribute to gout recovery.

Honey for Gout Studies

At this stage, I haven’t done a complete search for evidence about the effects of honey on gout. So for now I present a timeline of research. Then if you are interested in a more thorough review send me feedback on the form below. Or in the gout forum.

Anti-inflammatory Honey with Uric Acid Blockers
This is a study of the protective effect of honey against stomach ulcers induced in rats by indomethacin[1]. Groups of rats were pre-treated with chestnut honey. Some honey was supplemented with ginseng, propolis, royal jelly and propolis, and eucalyptus. As well as anti-inflammatory properties of honey, the report notes inhibition of xanthine oxidase as well as protection against stomach ulcers.
More Anti-inflammatory Honey with Better Uric Acid Blocking
Our second report studies three honeys – oak, chestnut, and polyfloral[2]. With oak honey being the best uric acid blocker. The study concludes that honey is “important to alternative medicine as protective agents and in the treatment of gastric ulcer and gout.”
Honey with Cinnamon Beats Allopurinol
Our third study compares 50 gout sufferers in two uric acid treatment groups[3]. One group were treated with a cinnamon tea with honey. Compared to a control group treated with 100 mg allopurinol daily. The test treatment was made by heating 15 grams cinnamon in 100 cc water at 90°C for 30 minutes. Then adding 1 tablespoon of honey. Allopurinol reduced the average blood uric acid level from 8.02 mg/dL to 6.59 mg/dL. But the honey and cinnamon group average uric acid fell from 8.69 to 6.04.

Honey for Gout Summary

Like many food items, honey has not had the same kind of testing we expect to see for prescription gout medicines. But there are 3 studies giving evidence that honey can benefit gout sufferers.

In particular, the third study suggests that honey is an excellent treatment for gout sufferers. Though further testing is required because this study:

  • Includes cinnamon as well as honey.
  • Is a small sample size.
  • Only lasts for 1 week.
Do you use Honey with Cinnamon to Reduce Your Uric Acid?

Honey for Your Gout

You can see that honey is a natural uric acid blocker. Especially mixed with cinnamon. So this could be part of your uric acid treatment. But you must discuss this with your doctor. As sugars in honey are not suitable for everyone.

To share your questions, experiences, or opinions about honey for gout. Please leave feedback below or in the gout forum.

Leave Honey for Gout to read Gout Natural Remedies.


Honey for Gout References

  1. Nasuti, Cinzia, Rosita Gabbianelli, Giancarlo Falcioni, and Franco Cantalamessa. “Antioxidative and gastroprotective activities of anti-inflammatory formulations derived from chestnut honey in rats.” Nutrition Research 26, no. 3 (2006): 130-137.
  2. Sahin, Huseyin. “Honey as an apitherapic product: its inhibitory effect on urease and xanthine oxidase.” Journal of enzyme inhibition and medicinal chemistry 31, no. 3 (2016): 490-494.
  3. Nurhayati, Yeti, and Tresia Umarianti. “Therapy of Cinnamon Decoction using Honey in Reducing Gout.” Indonesian Journal of Medicine 3, no. 3 (2019): 124-128.

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