Allopurinol Gout Treatment

Allopurinol gout treatment is the most common form of long-term gout treatment. It works by blocking the enzyme, xanthine oxidase, that normally produces uric acid. So it is vital that you have regular uric acid tests whilst on this treatment.

Before you begin taking allopurinol, you must be aware that all uric acid lowering therapies can trigger a painful gout flare. But this will diminish as you keep taking the medication. Because it is caused by uric acid crystals that have accumulated in your body tissue dissolving. So it is vital that you get rid of these crystals to avoid crippling joint damage. Therefore you must manage this pain for the few weeks or months that it takes to dissolve them. See my explanation of allopurinol medication for more details.

You will normally start with 50mg – 100mg allopurinol tablets, followed by a blood test. But it is important to go straight back to your doctor if you notice any allopurinol side-effects. Because in a very small number of cases, you can have a strong reaction against this drug. So it is vital that this is picked up immediately.

The blood test will indicate if your dosage needs to be increased. So a common allopurinol gout treatment dosage is 300mg. But this will depend entirely on your particular circumstances. Then repeat blood tests at the interval advised by your doctor to ensure this dosage is right for you.

Although allopurinol gout treatment is common, it is also commonly misused. Because as I reported in my December 2006 Newsletter, less than half of gout patients who start allopurinol treatment continue with it. Of those that do, only one person in three will take a sufficient dose to lower uric acid to the level that will dissolve all uric acid crystals.

For successful allopurinol gout treatment, remember:

  • Take pain relief as a precaution, or as you need it
  • Continue to drink water all the time to flush oxipurinol from your system
  • Get uric acid tests to make sure levels are maintained below 5mg/dL (0.30mmol/L)
  • Take allopurinol every day
  • Do not stop taking allopurinol unless advised by your doctor
Is Allopurinol Gout Treatment getting your Uric Acid Safe?

More Allopurinol Gout Treatment Information

There is in-depth information about all aspects of allopurinol gout treatment in the Gout Treatment Section. The information is spread over several pages starting on the allopurinol page within the uric acid lowering subsection.

Allopurinol Gout Treatment Spelling

Like many medicines, allopurinol is often misspelled. Though spelling is often overrated, it pays to take extra care with medicines, as a misunderstanding might cause treatment problems in the unlikely event of a similar sounding drug being taken mistakenly.

Alipurinal

allo changed to ali, and nol changed to nal.

Alipurinol

allo changed to ali.

Allipurinal

allo changed to alli, and nol changed to nal.

Allopurinal

nal ending changed to nol. This is the most frequent mis-spelling of allopurinol

Allopurino

Missing final l.

Allopurinol

This is the correct spelling of allopurinol – the most common gout treatment for lowering uric acid.

allopurionol

purinol changed to purionol [extra o added before nol].

Alluporinol

lupo changed to lopu.

Allupurinol

lop changed to lup.

Alopurenol

allo changed to alo, and purin changed to puren.

Alopurinal

allo changed to alo, and nol changed to nal.

Alopurinol

allo changed to alo.

Alupronol

allo changed to alu, and puri changed to pro.

Alupurionol

Allo changed to Alu, and extra o added before nol.

appurinol

allo changed to ap.

Purinol

Purinol is a brand of allopurinol manufactured by Europharm

All these spellings refer to the allopurinol gout treatment. If you are aware of other alternative spellings, please share them on the gout forum.

This article was first published prior to May 2008 and is reformatted here to suit the updated layout.

Leave Allopurinol Gout Treatment to read more allopurinol information.

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Medical Disclaimer: The pupose of GoutPal is to provide jargon-free explanations of medical gout-related terms and procedures. Because gout sufferers need to know what questions to ask their doctor. Also, you need to understand what your doctor tells you. So this website explains gout science. But it is definitely NOT a substitute for medical advice.

Information on this website is provided by a fellow gout sufferer (Keith Taylor) with an accountant's precision for accurate data. But no medical qualifications. So you must seek professional medical advice about gout and any other health matters.

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