Febuxostat: Be Euphoric About Uloric

Febuxostat Lowers Uric Acid

Lower Uric Acid
Febuxostat is hailed as the new millennium’s gout wonder drug.
The first new gout drug in 40 years.
But is it any good?

This new treatment for lowering uric acid has been trialed extensively throughout the world.

Since 2009, we have seen a raft of trial results published. Then, we saw gradual adoption by health authorities in different countries. Because has been marketed under the brand name Adenuric, or Adenuric TMX-67. Also, as Uloric, Feburic, and more.

FDA acceptance marks a significant milestone in the acceptance of this new gout treatment. It’s manufacturers gained the confidence of the FDA in November 2008. When they recommended approval based on extensive febuxostat research. Then, from February 2009, they marketed febuxostat in the US as Uloric.

The most significant aspect of Uloric is when allopurinol cannot be tolerated. Because lowering uric acid is crucial to gout sufferers. So, Anything that helps gout patients to lower uric acid is a very very good thing.

Just as with allopurinol, you are likely to need pain relief until all uric acid crystals (urate) in your body have dissolved. Then, once the treatment has rid you of urate build-up, you can continue to take it daily, and live a gout free life.

If you use Adenuric, or Uloric, or have opinions about using it, please join the febuxostat debate.

Please see febuxostat in the Gout Treatment section for latest information.

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Medical Disclaimer: The pupose of GoutPal is to provide jargon-free explanations of medical gout-related terms and procedures. Because gout sufferers need to know what questions to ask their doctor. Also, you need to understand what your doctor tells you. So this website explains gout science. But it is definitely NOT a substitute for medical advice.

Information on this website is provided by a fellow gout sufferer (Keith Taylor) with an accountant's precision for accurate data. But no medical qualifications. So you must seek professional medical advice about gout and any other health matters.

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