U-D-R-P The Gout Pain Pathway

U-D-R-P, The Gout Pain Pathway, is my explanation of the true reasons why gout is so painful. Many common assumptions are misleading. Many people explain gout pain as a result of sharp uric acid crystals penetrating joint tissues. That is wrong, because uric acid crystals are microscopically small. At that size, physical sharpness is a meaningless property.

This is important, because if you do not understand the true gout pain pathway, you cannot select the right treatments that you need for gout relief.

The UDRP Gout Pain Pathway starts with excess uric acid in the bloodstream. It ends when you make uric acid safe. The four steps of UDRP are:

  1. Uric Acid Elevated
  2. Deposits of Uric Acid Crystals
  3. Reaction from the immune system giving joint inflammation
  4. Painful Gout

Learn how uric acid affects your gout in the uric acid guidelines.

Leave U-D-R-P The Gout Pain Pathway to browse the Uric Acid Guidelines

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Medical Disclaimer: The pupose of GoutPal is to provide jargon-free explanations of medical gout-related terms and procedures. Because gout sufferers need to know what questions to ask their doctor. Also, you need to understand what your doctor tells you. So this website explains gout science. But it is definitely NOT a substitute for medical advice.

Information on this website is provided by a fellow gout sufferer (Keith Taylor) with an accountant's precision for accurate data. But no medical qualifications. So you must seek professional medical advice about gout and any other health matters.

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