Uric Acid Reference Range for Blood

Uric Acid Reference Range is my review of reference ranges for uric acid blood tests. In detail, I look at typical reference ranges for uric acid blood tests. Then I explain why, if you have been diagnosed with gout, you must ignore these ranges.

Uric Acid Reference Range Audience

I wrote Uric Acid Reference Range for all gout sufferers who want to understand uric acid normal range. Because many doctors misinterpret uric acid normal range. So that can hinder your gout diagnosis. Also, the misunderstanding can hinder your uric acid treatment. Therefore, you should learn about uric acid reference range so that you can understand, or question, your doctor’s advice.

Uric Acid Reference Range

To compile this report, I searched the Internet for uric acid reference range calcultion. So, this produced various results from labs, lab suppliers, and medical reference texts. Next, where results gave values for the 24-hour uric acid excretion test, I searched the specific website for a uric acid blood test reference range. Then, I copied those values into this chart:

Uric Acid Reference Range Table

I’ve listed reference ranges published for Males (M) and Females (F). All uric acid normal range values are mg/dL (see Uric Acid Normal Range Summary below). Also, some laboratories included brief notes, which I have included in the references, below.

Along the way, I found an interesting explanation regarding reference range variations[11]:

  • Ranges vary from lab to lab “due to differences in testing equipment, chemical reagents used, and analysis techniques.”
  • Normal results don’t promise good health. Because “there is a lot of overlap among results from healthy people and those with diseases”.
  • Abnormal results don’t mean you’re ill. Because “reference values are based on statistical ranges in healthy people, you may be one of the healthy people outside the statistical range”.
Meaningless Reference Range Statistics vs Medical Uric Acid Levels

Uric Acid Reference Range Summary

My interpretation of these facts about the uric acid reference range is:

  1. They are only useful to statisticians. Because they make no mention of medically safe values.
  2. They confuse doctors. In 2011 I consulted with 4 doctors about uric acid lowering treatment. I had to explain that “normal” ranges are medically meaningless, statistical references to 3 out of 4. Hence my ongoing assertion that 75% of doctors do not understand uric acid reference ranges. Your mileage may vary. But, there is a clear danger that gout patients get inadequate uric acid lowering treatment due to these ranges.
  3. They confuse patients. Anecdotally, from our gout forums, we know that many gout sufferers are confused why they have been diagnosed with gout when uric acid is normal. Conversely, many gout sufferers fail to get an accurate diagnosis because uric acid is normal.
  4. The gender distinction is meaningless. Because medically, post-menopausal females have the same gout profile as males.

Uric Acid Normal Range Summary

As described, the values for each uric acid normal range are in mg/dL. However, other units for the uric acid reference range are common. So, I am preparing charts for mmol/L and μmol/L:

  • Uric Acid Normal Range mmol/L
  • Uric Acid Normal Range μmol/L

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Your Uric Acid Reference Range

In conclusion, you can see that uric acid reference ranges are laboratory statistics about average uric acid levels. Therefore, you should ignore them. But never ignore your actual uric acid test result. Because all gout sufferers should know their uric acid level and work with their doctor to make it safe.

If you need personal help to interpret uric acid reference ranges, ask in the gout forum.

Leave Uric Acid Reference Range to browse more Understanding Uric Acid Resources.


Uric Acid Reference Range References

  1. URIC ACID – GBMC Test Dictionary. Method: Colorimetric.
  2. Wallach, Jacques Burton. Interpretation of diagnostic tests. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007.
  3. LabTests – Uric Acid (UA).
  4. Quest Diagnostics Uric Acid .
  5. David McAuley, Pharm.D. Common Laboratory (LAB) Values [ U ] – serum uric acid. Male: 238 – 506 µmol/L Female: 149 – 446 µmol/L.
  6. “Uric Acid in Refrigerated Serum” NHANES 2011-2012. There are no critical call back values for uric acid. For this study we will early report results if uric acid is greater than 12.9 mg/dL.
  7. Uric Acid assay on the ARCHITECT c Systems™ and the AEROSET System. Adult, Male 0.21 to 0.42 mmol/L. Adult, Female 0.15 to 0.35 mmol/L.
  8. Spinreact Quantitative determination of uric acid. Serum or plasma: Women 149 – 405 μmol/L; Men 214 – 458 μmol/L. These values are for orientation purpose; each laboratory should establish its own reference range.
  9. CLINIQA Uric Acid Reagent. It is recommended that every laboratory establish its own reference range.
  10. ARUP Laboratories Laboratory Reference.
  11. American Association for Clinical Chemistry. “Reference Ranges and What They Mean“. Lab Tests Online.
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Medical Disclaimer: The pupose of GoutPal is to provide jargon-free explanations of medical gout-related terms and procedures. Because gout sufferers need to know what questions to ask their doctor. Also, you need to understand what your doctor tells you. So this website explains gout science. But it is definitely NOT a substitute for medical advice.

Information on this website is provided by a fellow gout sufferer (Keith Taylor) with an accountant's precision for accurate data. But no medical qualifications. So you must seek professional medical advice about gout and any other health matters.

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